Rock 'n' Roll History for
February 10






1942 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
"Chattanooga Choo Choo" by Glen Miller And His Orchestra becomes the first recording to be awarded a Gold record. It was actually just a master copy of the disc sprayed with gold lacquer by RCA as a publicity stunt. The actual award recognized today as a Gold Record would not be initiated for another sixteen years when the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) borrowed the idea and trademarked the Gold Record. The first Gold single was awarded to Perry Como in 1958 for "Catch A Falling Star" and the first Gold album was given to Gordon McRae for the soundtrack to Oklahoma.

1956 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Little Richard records "Long Tall Sally", which will go on be his highest charting record in the US, climbing to number 6 on Billboard's Pop chart and number 1 on the R&B chart by next April. Rolling Stone magazine has listed the tune as #56 on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time.

1958 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Elvis attains his ninth US number one single with the double-sided hit "Don't" / "I Beg of You".

February 10
Frank Sinatra's "Come Fly With Me" rose to the top of the Billboard album chart, where it would stay for the next five weeks. At the inaugural Grammy Awards in 1959 the LP was nominated for Album Of The Year, but lost to Henry Mancini's "The Music from Peter Gunn".

1959 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Link Wray performs his controversial instrumental hit "Rumble" on American Bandstand. Because of its title, many radio stations refused to play the record, but it still managed to sell over a million copies and reach #16 on the Billboard Pop chart.

1962 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Henry Mancini had the #1 album in the US with the soundtrack to the film Breakfast At Tiffany's.

1964 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
American newspapers report that "millions of teenage boys are spending extra time in front of the mirror trying to make their hair look like Paul McCartney's", following an appearance of the Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show the previous night.

1967 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
The Beatles and George Martin added the orchestral crescendos to "A Day In The Life", using a 40-piece orchestra. Martin would later recall that when he told some of Britain's finest musicians that they were to play twenty-four bars of cacophonous, improvised crescendo, "They all looked at me as though I were completely mad."

1968 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
The Beatles close Beatles USA, their American fan club and business office and fire their US press agents, severing all American business connections. They also withdraw from the late Brian Epstein's NEMS Enterprises and turn all business affairs over to their newly formed record company, Apple.

February 10
French orchestra leader Paul Mauriat pushed all Rock records aside and reached Billboard's top spot with a harpsichord and violin laden instrumental called "Love Is Blue". Mauriat was no stranger to US success as he had written the music to Peggy March's 1963 number one hit "I Will Follow Him".

1972 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Britain's most popular Glam-rock act, T-Rex, kicks off their first headlining tour of the US in support of their current hit, "Bang A Gong".

1975 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Producer Phil Spector is involved in a car accident and suffers multiple head and body injuries. He eventually made a full recovery.

1979 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Rod Stewart enjoyed his third Billboard number one hit with "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?". The record also went to the top in ten other countries.

1993 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Oprah Winfrey interviews Michael Jackson on her prime-time special on ABC-TV. Jackson tells her that he has a disorder that destroys the pigmentation of the skin. He also claims he's had very little plastic surgery.

1997 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Brian Connolly, vocalist for Sweet, who reached #3 in 1973 with "Little Willy", died of kidney failure at the age of 52.

2005 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
Roger Daltrey of The Who was awarded the CBE (Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace for services to the music industry.

2008 - ClassicBands.com

February 10
The Eagles won a Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for "How Long". It was the band's fifth Grammy Award.






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