Rock 'n' Roll History for
August 13






1952 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
The original version of "Hound Dog" was recorded by Willie Mae (Big Mama) Thornton. It would become the first hit for the song-writing team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and would top the Billboard R&B chart for seven straight weeks, selling nearly two million copies.

1955 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Due to the large number of Pop hits which are remakes of R&B hits, Savoy Records announces that those wanting to record cover versions of songs must obtain permission from the US copyright office.

1959 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Brenda Lee recorded "Sweet Nothin's", which will prove to be her breakthrough hit and launched her Hall Of Fame career.

August 13
Bobby Darin signs a six-year film contract with Paramount, which is expected to earn him $1 million.

1964 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
The Kinks reach the UK charts for the first time with "You Really Got Me". The song will top the British list a month later and climb to #7 in the US.

1965 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
The Beatles' second film, Help! opens in New York, two weeks after its London premiere.

August 13
The Jefferson Airplane made their stage debut at the Matrix Club in San Francisco. Before the year is out, they'll become the first San Francisco Rock group to sign a major recording contract.

1966 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Two days after John Lennon's apology for saying the Beatles were more popular than Jesus Christ, radio station KLUE in Longview, Texas organizes a Beatles Bonfire where the group's records and memorabilia were destroyed. The next morning, the station's transmission tower was struck by lightning, halting all broadcasting and rendering the news director unconscious.

August 13
"Summer In The City" by The Lovin' Spoonful hit the top of the Billboard singles chart and the Cashbox Best Sellers list. The song started out as a poem written by John Sebastian's brother, Mark, before the band changed some words and then set it to music. The record reached #8 in the UK.

1967 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
The Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow Joan Baez to perform at Constitution Hall in Washington D.C. because of her opposition to the Vietnam War.

1969 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
The Guess Who record "American Woman", which will become a Top Ten hit in the US, Canada, Switzerland and the Netherlands. The same week, they receive their first American Gold record for "These Eyes".

1971 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
37-year-old session musician King Curtis was stabbed to death while arguing with a pair of drug dealers he discovered on the steps outside his Manhattan apartment. Born Curtis Ousley, his saxophone can be heard on many hits in the '50s and '60s, including The Coasters' "Yakety Yak". He later led Aretha Franklin's backing band, The Kingpins, and opened for The Beatles during their 1965 performance at Shea Stadium.

August 13
John Lennon flew from Heathrow Airport to New York. He would never set foot on British soil again, although he was planning to return to visit his Aunt Mimi right before he was murdered in December, 1980.

1977 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Canada's Bachman-Turner Overdrive, who had reached the Billboard Top 40 seven times since 1974, announce that they are splitting up. Their biggest hits included "Takin' Care Of Business" (#12), "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" (#1) and "Roll On Down The Highway" (#14).

1980 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Todd Rundgren, best remembered for his 1978 hit, "Hello, It's Me", was held hostage while his house is robbed by four masked men. Rundgren, his girlfriend and three houseguests were bound and gagged during the theft. It was reported that one of the intruders had been humming Todd's hit "I Saw The Light" during the robbery.

1982 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Several American record companies announced staff cuts as the industry fell into 'the worst shape in its history.'

1983 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
KC And The Sunshine Band were at #1 on the UK singles chart with "Give It Up", which would end up as the 18th best-selling single of the year. The song peaked at #18 in the US in January, 1984 and would be the band's final chart maker in both countries.

1990 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Curtis Mayfield, best known for his early 1970s hits, "Freddie's Dead" and "Superfly", was left paralyzed from the neck down after a stage lighting structure fell on him during an outdoor concert in Brooklyn. Mayfield passed away on December 26, 1999.

2003 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Ed Townsend, who scored a Billboard #13 hit with "For Your Love" in 1958, died of heart failure at the age of 74.

2009 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Les Paul, the man who invented the solid-body electric guitar, died of complications from pneumonia at the age of 94. With Mary Ford, his wife from 1949 to 1962, he earned 36 gold records for hits including "Vaya Con Dios" and "How High the Moon", both of which reached #1 in the US.

2015 - ClassicBands.com

August 13
Jimmy Page told The Daily Beast that he doesn't foresee another Led Zeppelin reunion in the future. The last time the three surviving members played together was in 2007 for a one-off show at London's O2 with John Bonham's son Jason on drums.






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